Nature for wellbeing

Nature for wellbeing

Graham Makepeace-Warne

Nature makes us happier

There is increasing scientific research indicating an important link between time spent in nature and overall wellbeing. This research also suggests that children are spending a significantly less amount of time outdoors than generations have done in the past.

Our work to encourage more wild lives 

Specific concerns on the Isle of Man are twofold. First, is the limited amount of outdoor time and nature-based activities in school curricula. Secondly, the current state of the Isle of Man countryside makes it difficult for the general population to enjoy these spaces. The Isle of Man has many natural sites, however many are small and isolated, lacking adequate interpretation and do not provide access for persons with restricted mobility. The Isle of Man could also benefit from sites created specifically for family activities and environmental education. 

Engaging people of all ages with nature

Our Biodiversity Education Officer educates and inspires thousands of school-age children working with teachers to provide informative, interactive indoor and outdoor events organised for school classes, Scouts and Guide packs, church groups and more. Interested? Get in touch

Our Wildlife Watch club for children and teens encourages awareness of nature and positive feelings for the world we live in, increasing understanding of our environment and fostering a caring attitude towards wildlife and conservation.

Rook pooling

(c) Ann Marie Kilgallon

Creating more wild spaces

Nine of our  nature reserves are open to the public and are equipped with interpretation material to encourage people to explore on their own. 

Our new project, Ramsey Eco-Active, is a 60 acre wooded playground designed to engage the whole family with nature based obstacles, trails and activities. We are also campaigning to create a countryside gateway site in Douglas, which will provide access to all, irrespective of income, age or knowledge of the countryside.

corncrake

Fergus Gill/2020VISION

Studies indicate that spending as little as 15 minutes per day outdoors in nature increases confidence, decreases obesity, improves relationships, increases creativity, lowers recovery times of trauma and surgery, prevents mental health problems and aids recovery from mental health problems, increases happiness and the list goes on. 

 

Visit a nature reserve

Andree Dubbeldam